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measuring for draperies
Your space is great. You've got your furniture laid out, your decor in place, and now you're ready to tackle your windows. This aspect of decorating can certainly be daunting to home owner and we totally get that. So we're here to help! We'll be updated this page with helpful videos in the near future but we wanted to get some basic guidelines up to get you started. If you have any additional questions, just click the green "Get In Touch" button at the bottom right of our page.

1. LENGTH
Length is best determined after having your hardware in place. Don't have your hardware yet? Don't worry! You can get a pretty accurate idea by taking a few things into consideration.

- I HAVE MY HARDWARE:
Great! Where you'll measure from will depend on thdrapery hardwaree type of drapery header you're going with. All headers that hang on rings will start from the bottom of your drapery ring (as it hangs on your rod) down to where you'd like your drapery panel to hit your floor. If you're using a rod pocket, then you'll start from the top of your rod down to the floor.


- I DON'T HAVE MY HARDWARE YET:
No worries! We'd recommend browsing hardware options to get an idea of the size rod you'd like to help determine how much space to leave for your rod/brackets. Then, you can estimate the needed amount of space by considering your desired rod diameter/set up. When in total doubt and plan on using a thinner rod (1.5" or less), we'd go with allowing 2"-3" of space. Again, if using a rod pocket, you'd start from the top of the rod down to the floor.

2. SO HOW HIGH ABOVE MY WINDOW SHOULD I BRING MY ROD?
We recommend absolutely no less than 4"-6" above the top of your window trim. Anything less can bring your ceilings down visually. Our personal preference is to bring the rod all the way to the ceiling OR if your space is very very tall, then 10" - 12" above your trim. Check out these options below:

Example of hanging drapes up to the ceiling. Also notice how she chose to hang the far right drapes on the taller wall to be in line with the windows on the fireplace wall. Drapery shown is our Color Block Panel in Cream/Graphite. (Photo courtesy of Alyson Skinner)


Another example of bringing your rod up to the ceiling. Here, a bit of wiggle room was allowed (a few inches below the ceiling). This bit of room allows you to raise or lower the rod a little to make the drapes hit the floor exactly as she intended. Drapery shown is our Striped Panel in White/Ocean. (Photo courtesy of Honey & Fitz)

This example shows how to handle a large space between the top of the window and the ceiling. Here, the space above the windows were split by the drapery hardware in a very appealing way by not just splitting the difference in half but off centering it. A beautiful way to still bring height to the windows without taking the drapes all the way to the ceiling. Drapery shown is a custom project in our WHITE/COBALT/OCEAN. (Design and photo courtesy of Joy Lang)

3. WIDTH
As a general rule, you'll always want to bring your rod wider than your actual space. This allows for your drapery panels to push off your window some and allow light in when the drapes are opened. It also gives the appearance of a larger window. We recommend no less than 3" but typically prefer 6"-10" on each side if the space allows. The above photo of the blue stripe drapes give a beautiful example of this. 

Here's another angle of this space using the space on either side of the window.

And another allowing the drapes to come off of the door space so that the view is not obstructed during the day. Drapery shown is our Banded Panel in White/Silver. (Photo courtesy of Kelly Lautenbauch)

 

*****PLEASE CHECK BACK FOR VIDEOS ON MEASURING AND DRESSING OUT YOUR PANELS*****